Suggestions for Shooting Hand-Held

Discussion forum for techniques and issues relating to the creation of panoramic and/or "mosaic" images

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andrewj
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Suggestions for Shooting Hand-Held

Post by andrewj » Mon Aug 11, 2008 6:44 am

Hi, I often work in conditions where tripods are not allowed. Are there any good shooting technique tips to increase the chance of success when doing panoramas in these conditions?
Thanks
Andrew

panhobby
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Post by panhobby » Mon Aug 11, 2008 2:48 pm

Hi Andrew,

I would like to say that shooting panorama hand-held is really possible and this is much more easy and faster to do than trying to tune a panohead. But this requires some practice before getting good results.

Main points to keep in mind :
1) Try to move around your camera (and not the opposite)
2) Avoid elements that are too closed to the camera - because you are not using a panoramic head, parallax error will not be really visible if there are not closer elements in the scene.
3) All other rules are applicables (uniform exposure, white balance, management of moving elements, ...).

Of course with this approach, because it is much more difficult to control overlapping of pictures, most of the time, you will need more pictures and overlap a bit more your pictures. But this is not a big deal. The bigger size I got is 37MP with 14 pictures of 6MP.

Hope this help,

PH

terje.mathisen
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Use the string trick?

Post by terje.mathisen » Mon Aug 18, 2008 4:40 am

I have had good luck with a rubber band around the lens, with a piece of string and car keys on the end of the string:

As you turn around, keep the keys above a fixed point on the ground, and you're OK even for pretty close objects.

Otherwise just learn to lean back and rotate around the lens instead of your head. :-)

Terje

waters
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Post by waters » Mon Aug 25, 2008 9:03 am

In addition to the rubber band and string trick, as well as a level bubble, a compass can help to give even rotation increments. Maybe I should invent a combination hot shoe bubble / compass.

dp.math
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Post by dp.math » Mon Aug 25, 2008 10:26 am

do you know this

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sbprzd/270524077/

He's a master!

andrewj
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Post by andrewj » Mon Aug 25, 2008 10:58 am

Thanks for the suggestions, everyone.
I'll experiment and let you know how I get on.
Andrew :D

tko
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some of my trick

Post by tko » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:55 am

1.) tie a string or Velcro loop around the barrel, run a 2nd string down to the ground and stand on it, pull string to ground tight, pivot around string on barrel.

2.) Put elbow on solid surface like a table, pinch lens barrel between two fingers like a yoke, keep wrist straight, pivot by rotating forearm and wrist together.

3.) Try NOT to look through viewfinder, because that forces the camera to pivot around the neck as the head rotates. Instead, pull the head back from the viewfinder and guess (do a few practice shots) at the rotation..

I've actually made the worlds lightest pano head - basically an old Nikon click stop pano head, a light ball head to level, and a clamp (for mounting on a railing), or a suction cup (for smooth surfaces. This is how I get my panos in Hong Kong at Victoria peak or the waterfront (Star Ferry). Actually sturdier than a tripod, but I can carry this all day long.

joergen geerds
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Re: Suggestions for Shooting Hand-Held

Post by joergen geerds » Tue Feb 10, 2009 1:36 pm

Hi Andrew,

as another poster mentioned, a philopod might help you:
http://www.philohome.com/tripod/shooting.htm

plph56
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Post by plph56 » Tue Jan 04, 2011 1:47 am

I recently came back from India were at most of their monuments (particularly the Taj Mahal and Humayan's Tomb) they do not allow tripods.

I found that by only taking 2 horizontal photos (as opposed to my usual 6 vertical photos) I was able to come up with some good panoramic photos.

Also try taking a lot of pairs of photos even at the same camera settings in case some of them suffer from camera shake or don't line up properly. If possible reset your camera either on a solid object or even on your knee.

I hope that this helps you out.

richard cooper
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Pano's handheld

Post by richard cooper » Thu Jan 06, 2011 10:50 am

I only shoot panoramas hand held as follows.

First, I am the point that the camera rotates about thinking of me as a monopod. Place your feet in a comfortable solid position.

Second, elbows are held to your body and the camera eye piece viewer is held steady to your head.

Third, look though the eye piece viewer (portrait or landscap shooting) and rotate your body at your waist. This is the only moving part except for triggering the shutter button.

Fourth, overlap is determined by (rotating right) noting the scene at the right side of the camera eye viewer and when you rotate the same scene will now be at the left side of the camera eye viewer. This produces a 15-20% plus or minus overlap.

Fifth, practice, practice and practice.

h-g-t
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Re: Pano's handheld

Post by h-g-t » Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:33 pm

richard cooper wrote: Third, look though the eye piece viewer (portrait or landscape shooting) and rotate your body at your waist. This is the only moving part except for triggering the shutter button.
I did this on one of my first digital panos (2 rows) and spent 2 weeks trying to get the top and bottom of a lighting column lined up (never did, had to bodge it).

If you rotate about your waist, your hands move sideways and this creates parallax errors. As the first poster said, rotate about your camera, not your body.
Inebriated with the exuberance of his own verbosity, and gifted with an egotistical imagination .....

billp
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Post by billp » Wed Jan 19, 2011 2:51 pm


h-g-t
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Dylosphere

Post by h-g-t » Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:10 pm

Inebriated with the exuberance of his own verbosity, and gifted with an egotistical imagination .....

billp
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Post by billp » Wed Jan 19, 2011 8:18 pm

Oops - dropped a slash.

Thanks for the correction.
I use this aid most of the time (using portrait mode and holding the camera at my waist). My yaw angles are usually very close to 60 degrees.

richard cooper
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Hand held

Post by richard cooper » Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:23 am

In reference to H-G-T comments, the following panoramic image was taken hand held. 9 portrait, total size is 10681X2936 at 300PPI and reduced in size to 1000 pixels wide for my web site.

There was no correction needed and as I said I most often shoot hand held.
Richard

take a look
http://globalnetworknews.info/Mary%20Je ... norama.jpg

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