British Columbia

Discussion forum for techniques and issues relating to the creation of panoramic and/or "mosaic" images

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panhobby
Posts: 110
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2006 11:58 am
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British Columbia

Post by panhobby » Sun May 01, 2011 7:34 am

Hello,

In June/July, I will be in British Columbia for vacations. Of course, I will bring with me my camera and many related accessories.

I'm looking for photographic and panoramic oriented information about that areas.

Do you know any website that presents pictures about BC?

Any recommandations of areas well appropriate for Pano shooting?

Any recommandations for shooting old forests?

Thanks a lot,

PH

dsjtecserv
Posts: 551
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 3:25 pm
Location: Northern Virginia
Contact:

Re: British Columbia

Post by dsjtecserv » Wed May 11, 2011 8:44 pm

Here are some from the Vancouver area, including some panos, that I shot a couple of years ago.

http://www.pbase.com/dsjtecserv/british_columbia

Dave

panhobby
Posts: 110
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2006 11:58 am
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Re: British Columbia

Post by panhobby » Sat May 21, 2011 1:41 am

Thanks to you Dave. Your gallery gave me some hints like the Vancouver skyline from the Stanley Park.

PH

kamchow
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2011 2:36 am

Re: British Columbia

Post by kamchow » Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:53 am

dsjtecserv -> first let me congratulate you on some excellent photographs.
(and an extended bravo to all photographers on this site)

now, i'm not knocking you - just searching for an answer.

look at this photo: http://www.pbase.com/dsjtecserv/image/109528068

basically, how da hell did you do that?

i mean, you have the sun in front and to the left of you.
so all shadows should be cast towards you / the camera.

but yet, on the bottom right, you have a shadow of yourself / someone being cast against the sun?!

further, on the far bottom right, there is another shadow, of a bush, that is also being cast against the sun and at a different angle to the shadow of the photographer??!!

so the question is - how on earth did you do that?

is it an optical illusion?
am i seeing things?
have i gone mad?

Growing
Posts: 44
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:48 am
Location: Newcastle, Australia

Re: British Columbia

Post by Growing » Mon Oct 10, 2011 12:07 am

kamchow wrote: look at this photo: http://www.pbase.com/dsjtecserv/image/109528068

basically, how da hell did you do that?

i mean, you have the sun in front and to the left of you.
so all shadows should be cast towards you / the camera.

but yet, on the bottom right, you have a shadow of yourself / someone being cast against the sun?!

further, on the far bottom right, there is another shadow, of a bush, that is also being cast against the sun and at a different angle to the shadow of the photographer??!!

so the question is - how on earth did you do that?

is it an optical illusion?
am i seeing things?
have i gone mad?
The image appears to be a 360 degree panorama, with cylindrical projection. You will notice that the distance between the sun and the photographers shadow is about 50% of the width of the image, which corresponds to 180 degrees on a 360-degree panorama. If you were to print out the image, wrap it around you in the shape of a cylinder and place your head at the centre, the scene would look quite normal and all the shadows would be facing the same direction.

Using panorama software such as Max's PTAssembler (the subject of this forum), a series of overlapping images taken in all directions around a common point can be stitched together to make such an image. I'm generally not a big fan of 360-degree images, but in this case, since there are no horizontal lines apart from the horizon, it works quite well and the result is spectacular.

Stephen

kamchow
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2011 2:36 am

Re: British Columbia

Post by kamchow » Tue Oct 11, 2011 3:58 am

ahhh, 360° view. that explains it. thanks.
and i agree, it is a spectacular photo.

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