Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

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maxlyons
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Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by maxlyons » Sat May 14, 2011 12:46 pm

I recently spent a few weeks reviewing, tidying up and organizing the stitched images that I have taken over the last 10 years. I was curious to see what sort of interesting data I could find in this inventory. I have just posted a new article that summarizes what I found:

http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons/panostats.htm

Max

dsp
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Re: Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by dsp » Sat May 14, 2011 3:19 pm

Interesting look at your pano taking, and habits. What do you think is the number of panos, and sizes, that you end up printing? From your pano per day chart, I think we could guess your free time/vacation schedule...
cheers, Darcy

Jim Zuccaro
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Re: Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by Jim Zuccaro » Sun May 15, 2011 10:22 pm

Max, I really like that analysis! I'm supprised that about half of your panos are cylindrical projection.

I didn't see it mentioned, but what do you think your 'batting average' is, that is scenes you took pictures of vs. completed panos? I think I probably end up stitching and saving less than one in ten of the sets of pictures that I take. Prob a lot less...

thanks, JIm Z

maxlyons
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Re: Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by maxlyons » Mon May 16, 2011 9:13 am

Darcy,

I'm not sure about prints, but I would guess that I have printed about 2 percent...sizes vary, but are usually about 40 to 60 inches wide, rarely less than 30 inches wide. I'm not sure about my deducing free-time/vacation schedule, but where there are long periods without any photographs often means I was busy writing software (e.g. PTAssembler, TuFuse, StarTracer, Image Stacker, etc.) with my free time, rather than taking photographs...I seem to concentrate on one activity or the other (software or photography), rather than both at the same time.

Jim,

I would guess that for every completed panorama I have 1 or 2 "unstitched" panoramas, although this is just a guess. Maybe I could go back and count up the total number of images I have taken and make a better guess. As for cylindrical projection, I use it much less frequently now that I have created rectilindrical projection. Since the start of 2009, only 25% of my panoramas use cyclindrical projection, but 40% use rectilindrical projection.

Max

Jim Zuccaro
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Re: Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by Jim Zuccaro » Mon May 16, 2011 9:13 pm

maxlyons wrote: <snip>
As for cylindrical projection, I use it much less frequently now that I have created rectilindrical projection. Since the start of 2009, only 25% of my panoramas use cyclindrical projection, but 40% use rectilindrical projection.
Max, I should have figured that out!

I am very grateful that you developed the different output projections. Kudos, many times over.

thanks, Jim Z

Growing
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Re: Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by Growing » Fri May 20, 2011 10:12 pm

I noticed some interesting stats from your analysis:

Panoramic Field of View

Your peak is in the range 100 to 150 degrees, with something like 120 degrees being most common. I find this interesting, and mirrors my own efforts.

Taking single images encompassing more than 105 degrees is quite difficult, due to lens geometry problems. For example, a 16mm lens on a 35mm sensor (10mm on APS-C) has only a horizontal field of view of 96 degrees, and this is the widest "commonly available" rectilinear lens that most photographers will have access to.

Once the problem of lens geometry is avoided (by stitching), I find that a whole world of photographic opportunities arise in the range 100 to 150 degrees, where the output does not appear at first sight to be "uber-wide", thanks to the innovative projections now available. These opportunities are simply unavailable to photographers limited to the single image, no matter how deep their wallet.

Once images pass 180 degrees, the opportunity to present the output as a 2D print on a wall that does not appear visually "odd" diminishes. Straight lines become very curved. Shadows point this way and that. Like an over-done HDR image, most such images appear somewhat grating to my eyes.

Panoramas by Aspect Ratio

I notice that your output peaks around 3:1.

I also find this ratio to be "best" for most situations. Any wider/longer, and the image begins to feel like looking through a slot. For images with less-than-extreme field of view, squarer (more conventional) aspect ratios often work well. But as the horizontal field of view passes around 100 degrees, I find an aspect ratio of 3:1 works well in most situations.

There is also the consideration of vertical vs horizontal compression. Assuming roughly equal vertical vs horizontal "degrees-per-inch" on the print, the 3:1 ratio lets you do 120x40 degrees. 120 degrees is the extent of the human binocular horizontal field of view (3D vision), and 40 degrees is the field of view of a "standard lens", which is around the region where images stop feeling "tight" or "long" and they start feeling "expansive" or "wide". I don't know if that is in anyway scientific, but it feels very natural to me for an expansive image, such as a landscape.

I think also that the aspect ratio of a panoramic print encourages the viewer to stand closer to the print, compared to a squarish or 3:2 print. It is only by bringing the viewer closer that the extraordinary detail possible in a stitched image can be appreciated.

Stephen

nickfan
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Re: Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by nickfan » Wed Mar 21, 2012 10:18 am

Hi Max,

Thx a lot for sharing the data. Just want to know the which fov do you mean, diagonal or horizontal?

nick

maxlyons
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Re: Ten years of Image Stitching in Numbers

Post by maxlyons » Thu Mar 22, 2012 10:57 pm

Nick,

It is the approximate horizontal field of view. I should emphasize "approximate". The horizontal FOV number describes the image that was created by PTAssembler, but the images are sometimes cropped after output from PTAssembler.

Max

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