sCMOS

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dsp
Posts: 586
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 11:09 am
Location: Hoboken, NJ

sCMOS

Post by dsp » Sun Sep 13, 2009 9:19 am

The first sCMOS (scientific CMOS) cameras have been appearing on the market. Eventually, this same technology will probably make it into the consumer cameras, giving us another way to have high sensitivity, (relatively) high dynamic range images. What these cameras do is essentially split the readout of the chip to two amplifiers, one low gain, one high gain, and then merge the results. It is like taking a picture at iso 100 and iso 3200 simultaneously, and then appropriately combining them. Here is a link to the white paper. The idea isn't necessarily new, but these are the first devices.

http://www.scmos.com/downloads/

cheers, Darcy

Jim Z
Posts: 774
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2005 9:16 pm
Location: Tahoma CA

Post by Jim Z » Mon Sep 14, 2009 12:21 am

Darcy,

As I understand your explaination, the idea is something that could be applied by consumer camera makers.

Your post reminded me of the Kodak idea for higher dynamic range, from a couple of years ago. I think that it was some fashion of replacing/removing some of the Bayer array filters, so that some of the photo recptr sites would be panchromatic, and more sensitive or responsive. The way I saw it explained, the array filters would be R-G-B-no filter-R-G-B-no filter, etc. It was supposed to revolutionize photography... and I forgot all about it, untill this post!

thanks
Jim Z

dsp
Posts: 586
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 11:09 am
Location: Hoboken, NJ

Post by dsp » Mon Sep 14, 2009 1:13 am

Hi Jim,
Yeah, it is very similar to that, only done electronically, with the same resolution per channel. With these modern image stabilized camaras, for most subjects in a non-scientific setting, you can almost certainly just get away with two exposures in very rapid succession - like using a fast electronic shutter (this would likely be the way the "open source" camera would do it first).

Like with the other things, how fast it makes its way into cameras has a lot to do with who owns the patent, how much they want to license it, if at all, and how easy it is to get around by varying the process!

cheers, Darcy

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