Best results. How?

Discussion forum for Tawbaware's TuFuse and TuFuse Pro software
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Antipeko
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Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:41 am

Best results. How?

Post by Antipeko » Mon May 31, 2010 6:10 am

Hi!

I have been using Tufuse Pro for a while but I do not manage to achieve the results I look for. Let's say I have two images, one where the highlights are correctly exposed and another one where the shadows are correctly exposed. When using Photoshop and layer masks, I would get a final image that contains the highlights exactly as they appear in the first image, and the shadows exactly as they appear in the second image. However, when using Tufuse Pro I do not manage to get the same image that I get with Photoshop. The resulting image with Tufuse contains highlights and shadows that are respectively darker and lighter than the originals ones. Is there a way tu finetune Tufuse so that I can achieve an image similar or quite close to the image I would get with Photoshop? Thanks!

Cheers,
Nicolás

maxlyons
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Re: Best results. How?

Post by maxlyons » Mon May 31, 2010 10:06 am

Antipeko wrote:when using Tufuse Pro I do not manage to get the same image that I get with Photoshop. The resulting image with Tufuse contains highlights and shadows that are respectively darker and lighter than the originals ones. Is there a way tu finetune Tufuse so that I can achieve an image similar or quite close to the image I would get with Photoshop?
There are lots of ways to configure TuFuse Pro. This page explains all of the options. I'm not sure what it is you are doing with Photoshop but, TuFuse Pro isn't intended to emulate or replicate Photoshop.

Max

waters
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Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 10:38 am

Post by waters » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:12 pm

Some time ago examples were posted by someone with how changing various settings affected the final fused image. Perhaps that posting can be brought back. I was similarly frustrated by TuFuse results until Terry was kind enough to clue me in. Then I started to see the real potential. Part of the problem is the number of variables, which makes figuring it out a bit haphazard. The documentation is helpful, but a bit Greek to many of us.

Antipeko
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:41 am

Post by Antipeko » Fri Jun 04, 2010 7:47 am

Thanks for the answers.

Max, I know Tufuse and PS are two different things. My problem is the same as the one posted here:
viewtopic.php?t=4948&start=0&postdays=0 ... t=settings

Let's say I have image A with well exposed shadows and image B with wel-exposed highlights. Ideally, I would like a fused image with shadows exclusively from A and highlights exclusively from B. Now this might not be possible at all. or maybe, if I play with certain parameters I may get close to that goal. So my question was about that. I may go through the help page you mentioned and play with one million combinations, spend half a year doing it and maybe get nothing. Or someone may otherwise "illuminate" me.

Thanks a lot!

maxlyons
Posts: 3649
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2003 8:55 pm
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Post by maxlyons » Fri Jun 04, 2010 9:08 am

Antipeko wrote:I would like a fused image with shadows exclusively from A and highlights exclusively from B. Now this might not be possible at all.
It is possible, but if you really want this, then you'll have to ensure that the "Combine mode" is set to "Maximum" and the number of pyramid levels is one. (TuFuse and TuFuse Pro have slightly different ways of accomplishing this. In Tufuse Pro, you'll have to set the "Fusion Pyramid Levels Adjustment" to -10). Something like this should do the trick:


Image



This way, there will be no multi-resolution blending (which is what cause pixels from one image to blend with pixels from another image), and areas in the output image will come "exclusively" from one input image or the other.

However, if you do this, you'll probably soon realize that it isn't really what you want. The transition between the regions that come from one image and the regions that come from the other input image will be obvious and abrupt. So, you'll probably want to allow the number of levels to increase. As you do this, you'll see that the transition between the areas that come "exclusively" from one image and the areas that come "exclusively" from the other image becomes more gradual and less obvious, and that the regions that come "exclusively" from one input image or the other become smaller and smaller until there are no pixels in the output image that come exclusively from either input image. By the time that you have increased the levels to the point where the transition is hard or impossible to see, you'll find that every pixel in the entire output image is a blend of hundreds of pixels from every input image over surprisingly large areas.

TuFuse doesn't work like naive layer blending in Photoshop, which, unfortunately, makes it difficult to understand. Based on threads here, numerous e-mail exchanges and conversations with others, I realize that there is a desire to attempt to compare TuFuse's controls to Photoshop functions/features, but this is probably likely to lead to more confusion than anything else! The algorithm it uses is fundamentally unlike anything that Photoshop offers of which I'm aware.

Max

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